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WPC open house keeps families, Airmen resilient

Family members test out a flying simulation during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. The simulators allow Warrior Preparation Center Airmen to train in-house without risk of life or limb. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Family members test out a flying simulation during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. The simulators allow Warrior Preparation Center Airmen to train in-house without risk of life or limb. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Warrior Preparation Center Airmen and their families participate in a game to see who can build the tallest free-standing structure out of spaghetti noodles and marshmallows during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. The activity demonstrated the importance of pre-planning, which is applied in the WPC mission. (U.S Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Warrior Preparation Center Airmen and their families participate in a game to see who can build the tallest free-standing structure out of spaghetti noodles and marshmallows during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. The activity demonstrated the importance of pre-planning, which is applied in the WPC mission. (U.S Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Master Sgt. John Zelinski, Polygone Electronic Warfare Training Range Live, Virtual, Constructive program manager, explains the capabilities of the Multinational Aircrew Electronic Warfare Training Facility Live Virtual Constructive Training System (MALTS) during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. As a detachment of the Warrior Preparation Center, Polygone uses MALTS to deliver world-class Integrated Air Defense System simulation anywhere in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Master Sgt. John Zelinski, Polygone Electronic Warfare Training Range Live, Virtual, Constructive program manager, explains the capabilities of the Multinational Aircrew Electronic Warfare Training Facility Live Virtual Constructive Training System (MALTS) during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. As a detachment of the Warrior Preparation Center, Polygone uses MALTS to deliver world-class Integrated Air Defense System simulation anywhere in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Family members test out a flying simulation during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. The simulators are modeled after different areas of deployed locations and allow Airmen to train and hone their skills for real-world situations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

Family members test out a flying simulation during an open house Aug. 25, 2016, at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany. The simulators are modeled after different areas of deployed locations and allow Airmen to train and hone their skills for real-world situations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Larissa Greatwood)

EINSIEDLERHOF AIR STATION, Germany --

Through the Warrior Preparation Center’s state-of-the-art technology and software, the Air Force is able to lead the fight in a more cost-efficient manner. By utilizing their equipment, they’re able to train effectively without the need to travel.

With their knowledge and expertise comes many training exercises and scenarios that cause the typical work day for these Airmen to expand beyond usual constraints. They can remain resilient through the support of their families understanding the roles they fill when it comes to the Air Force mission.

On Aug. 25, 2016 the WPC held an open house to allow family members to learn about the mission and test training equipment. Families had the opportunity to see firsthand why their service member’s contribution is so important.

“The families of the Warrior Preparation Center may not really understand what we do here,” said Capt. Sarah Nolder, U.S. Air Forces in Europe WPC flight commander.” This open house gave the families insight into what their family member’s job is. If they can understand what their loved one is doing, they can better support them which in turn supports the success of our mission.”

The WPC is made up of many different detachments. Some of these units showed off their capabilities during the open house.

“Different entities within the WPC displayed their equipment for the families to see and try out,” said Staff Sgt. Benjamin Seefeldt, USAFE WPC network system administrator. “Some of the things that were available was our flight simulators and constructing computers as well as games for the kids to play.”

Nolder said through events like the open house, their capabilities and support become stronger.

With support and understanding from families, the WPC Airmen can focus on the mission while at work ensuring their attention and commitment isn’t obstructed.