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Ramstein recognizes National Aviation Maintenance Technician Day

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Samuel Nemargut, 86th Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance journeyman, repairs chipped paint on a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Nov. 16, 2020. Conducting paint repairs prevent corrosion on the body of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew J. Alvarado)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Samuel Nemargut, 86th Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance journeyman, repairs chipped paint on a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Nov. 16, 2020. Conducting paint repairs prevent corrosion on the body of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew J. Alvarado)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ryan Hubbs, 86th Maintenance Squadron fuel cell technician, prepares to secure panels on a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft engine at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Nov. 16, 2020. Repaneling is the process of securing panels which were previously removed for inspection and repair of an aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew J. Alvarado)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ryan Hubbs, 86th Maintenance Squadron fuel cell technician, prepares to secure panels on a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft engine at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Nov. 16, 2020. Repaneling is the process of securing panels which were previously removed for inspection and repair of an aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew J. Alvarado)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Gregory Kolb, 86th Maintenance Squadron dock coordinator, secures the panel of a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft engine at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Nov. 16, 2020. A seven-level technician must verify the correct installation of the engine panels before the aircraft is cleared to fly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew J. Alvarado)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Gregory Kolb, 86th Maintenance Squadron dock coordinator, secures the panel of a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft engine at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Nov. 16, 2020. A seven-level technician must verify the correct installation of the engine panels before the aircraft is cleared to fly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew J. Alvarado)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany --

The 86th Airlift Wing will recognize the 14th annual National Aviation Maintenance Technician Day May 24, 2021, at Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

NAMTD highlights the hard work of aircraft maintainers across the globe.

“National Aviation Maintenance Technician Day honors the professionals who work behind the scenes to make aviation possible,” said Chief Master Sgt. Alan Malcolm, 86th AW Maintenance Group superintendent. “It also marks the achievements of Charles Taylor, the man who built the engine used to power the Wright Brothers’ airplane.”

NAMTD was made a U.S. day of recognition by Congress in 2007. It helps shine a light on the efforts of those who keep planes flying and gives people a chance to thank the people who generate air power.

”We often celebrate the achievements of aviators, and rightfully so, but behind each aircraft in the sky is a team of proud maintainers who put it there,” Malcolm said. “Maintainers are working hard around the clock to keep them flying!”

Aircrew get a lot of attention from people all over the world. But, often maintainers are lesser known names in history.

”When people think of aviation, some names come to mind: Yeager, Rickenbacker, Lindbergh, Earhart and Doolittle,” Malcolm said. “All of them deserve praise, but can you name any of their maintainers? Not likely, and that’s fine with us. Our pride comes from fixing an aircraft, watching it take off and return safely.”

For many maintainers pride comes with the job and an appreciation for their craft.

“As a crew chief, I like to work with different specialties to troubleshoot problems and it increases my knowledge about the air frame. To travel is one of the biggest highlights for me, especially traveling to places the unit hasn’t been to yet. Being on the road with the aircraft and making the mission happen builds a sense of accomplishment for me,” said Tech. Sgt.  Joshua Ohienmhenan, 86th Maintenance Group dedicated crew chief program manager.

The 86th MXG, like many others, will recognize all maintenance professionals around the country whether they are in the military or not. It’s a day to give thanks to those who keep the planes in the sky and the U.S. Air Force aiming high.