HomeNewsArticle Display

New name, who dis: 7 CWS

Photo of Airman forecasting weather

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Casey Brija, 7th Combat Weather Squadron weather forecaster, uses his instruments to measure cloud height, wind speed and wind direction at Alzey Dropzone, Flörsheim-Dalsheim, Germany, Sept. 30, 2020. Brija was responsible for collecting weather data to ensure Airmen could conduct airborne insertion operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Devin Boyer)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Niylan Atwood, 7th Combat Weather Squadron, Weather Operations Flight weather forecaster, participates in a field training exercise.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Niylan Atwood, 7th Combat Weather Squadron, Weather Operations Flight weather forecaster, participates in a field training exercise attached to the 1/214th General Support Aviation Battalion at U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden, Germany, Oct. 6, 2020. The 7th CWS supports all permanently assigned U.S. Army forces in Europe and Africa. (courtesy photo)

Photo of Airman forecasting weather in a field

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Casey Brija, 7th Combat Weather Squadron weather forecaster, uses his instruments to measure cloud height, wind speed and wind direction at Alzey Dropzone, Flörsheim-Dalsheim, Germany, Sept. 30, 2020. Brija was responsible for collecting weather data to ensure Airmen could conduct airborne insertion operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Devin Boyer)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Derrick Hargrove, 7th Combat Weather Squadron, Weather Operations Flight weather forecaster, is hoisted by fellow Airmen during a field training exercise.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Derrick Hargrove, 7th Combat Weather Squadron, Weather Operations Flight weather forecaster, is hoisted by fellow Airmen during a field training exercise attached to the 1/214th General Support Aviation Battalion at U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden, Germany, Oct. 6, 2020. The 7th CWS’s mission is to provide decision-grade environmental intelligence and combat-credible forces in support of U.S. Army Europe- Africa’s mission. (courtesy photo)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany -- The 7th Weather Squadron was re-designated as the 7th Combat Weather Squadron, Oct.1, 2020.

“The only thing that has changed is the name,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Nicholas Reitz, 7th CWS director of operations. “It’s not that our mission has changed, our name just finally reflects our mission. The re-designation was part of a greater effort to align the name and missions of five U.S Army weather support squadrons across the globe.”

The 7th CWS’s mission is to provide decision-grade environmental intelligence and combat-credible forces in support of U.S. Army Europe-Africa’s mission.

“The U.S. Army does not have an indigenous weather capability and relies on the U.S. Air Force to provide critical weather intelligence at every echelon of its mission,” Reitz said.

The 7th CWS provides indispensable weather intelligence to the Gen. Christopher Cavoli, U.S. Army Europe-Africa commanding general. They also brief rotary-wing aircrew and combat vehicles before every mission.

“We’re the only dedicated U.S. Air Force weather and environmental intelligence organization aligned in direct support to U.S. land component forces in the European and African theaters,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Damien Usita, 7th CWS weather operations manager.

The 7th CWS supports all permanently assigned U.S. Army forces in Europe and Africa.

“We integrate, deploy with, and provide direct support to Army command staff, ground-based and aviation units, and airfields,” Reitz said. “The 7th CWS Airmen have to be combat mission-ready at all times because at a moment’s notice they can deploy with their U.S Army counterparts. It’s a balance of “soldier skills” and technical expertise that make our Airmen so lethal.”

As the direct line of intelligence for USAREUR and USARAF, the 7th CWS provides roughly 24,000 weather products annually, supporting and protecting approximately 58,000 personnel and $3 billion in assets.

“Whether providing staff support, shaping command guidance or providing tactical observations and mission execution forecasts, our team of combat ready professionals ensure that U.S. land component forces are empowered with decision-grade environmental intelligence,” Usita said. “This maintains our advantage over our competitors in support of combat credible forces in the European and African theaters.”

Ultimately, the 7th CWS provides an immeasurable strategic advantage to the U.S. Army, exemplifying interoperability, agility and resilience.

“We enhance wartime planning by becoming part of the military decision-making process and allow senior leaders to effectively execute operation plans and exercises,” Reitz said. “Accurate weather prediction from the 7th CWS allows USAREUR to deter aggression from adversaries in the European theater.”