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86 AW conducts COVID-19 patient movement training

An Airman briefs a group of Airmen.

U.S. Air Force Maj. Kyle Gauthier, 37th Airlift Squadron assistant director of operations, briefs Airmen during a simulated coronavirus disease 2019 patient transfer training at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. Airmen assigned to the 86th Operations Group, 86th Medical Group and 86th Maintenance Group participated in the simulated open-air movement of COVID-19 positive patients on a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft. The collective effort ensured that all disinfecting processes were conducted correctly, placement of patients and barriers guaranteed the safest in-flight protection of aircrew, movement procedures for patients were correct, aircraft configuration was appropriate, and proper procedures allowed the fastest and safest turnaround time for getting the C-130J ready for the next mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

Airmen carry a mannequin on a gurney onto an aircraft.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron load a simulated coronavirus disease 2019 patient onto a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. The patient upload was part of a training in the overall process of moving COVID-19 positive patients in an open-air setting, while still keeping maintainers, flight crews and medical professionals as safe as possible. These trainings help prepare the 86th Airlift Wing to execute aeromedical evacuation of COVID-19 patients on C-130J aircraft in accordance with acceptable means of compliance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

An Airman secures the handle of a gurney.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Lance Derosier, 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron technician, secures a gurney holding a mannequin for simulated patient transfer aboard a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft during a coronavirus disease 2019 training at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. The training simulated the entire process of aeromedical evacuation of COVID-19 positive patients from upload to aircraft decontamination after patient download. Airmen were observed and evaluated by members of the 86th Operations Group throughout the process to assess readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

A row of Airmen sit aboard an aircraft.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron await departure aboard a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft during a simulated coronavirus disease 2019 patient transfer training at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. Personnel from the 86th Operations Group, 86th Medical Group and 86th Maintenance Group coordinated efforts to run through every aspect of evacuating COVID-19 patients in an open-air environment without compromising the safety of flight crews, medical professionals and maintainers. The training consisted of a simulated flight by taxiing to pick up simulated patients from one location on the airfield and transporting them to another location on the airfield for offloading and aircraft decontamination. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

An Airman hands a portable power system to another Airman.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron transfer a portable power system during a simulated coronavirus disease 2019 patient movement training at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. Safety cones were placed around the C-130J Super Hercules aircraft transporting the simulated patients to clear a perimeter and establish a transition point for potentially contaminated equipment to be removed from the aircraft. Airmen who were aboard the aircraft during simulated patient transfer handed-off medical equipment to Airmen who were not aboard the aircraft to practice minimizing risk of exposure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

Several Airmen break down and remove equipment inside an aircraft.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron break down and remove equipment inside a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft after simulated coronavirus disease 2019 patients are transferred during a training at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. Airmen from the 86th Operations Group, 86th Medical Group and 86th Maintenance Group coordinated efforts to practice moving COVID-19 patients in an open-air environment while still protecting the health and safety of flight crews, medical professionals and maintainers. After simulated patients and medical equipment were removed from the aircraft, disinfection procedures, led by the 86th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, commenced. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

Two Airmen stand inside an aircraft next to a row of ion distribution units.

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Thomas O’Brien, left, 86th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron support flight commander, and Tech. Sgt. Jason Burnham, 37th Airlift Squadron mobility noncommissioned officer in charge and C-130J loadmaster, finish setting up ion distribution units aboard a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. As part of an 86th Airlift Wing training for simulated coronavirus disease 2019 patient transfer in an open-air environment on a C-130J, aircraft disinfection procedures were the final step before mission completion. Prior to a complete wipe-down of the aircraft with disinfectant, ion distribution units are used to address the airborne threat of pathogens like COVID-19 in the overall decontamination process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class John R. Wright)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany -- Airmen assigned to the 86th Operations Group, 86th Medical Group and 86th Maintenance Group participated in a simulated open-air movement of COVID-19 positive patients on a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 30, 2020. The collective effort ensured that all disinfecting processes were conducted correctly, placement of patients and barriers guaranteed the safest in-flight protection of aircrew, movement procedures for patients were correct, aircraft configuration was appropriate, and proper procedures allowed the fastest and safest turnaround time for getting the C-130J ready for the next mission.