German civilian police enrich 86th SFS

Zivilpolizei Marcus Mueller, left, 86th Security Forces Squadron Patrolman, drives a patrol vehicle with U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Regan, 86th SFS member, on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Feb. 26, 2018. Zivilpolizei, or Civilian Security Police, are the civilian side of the 86th SFS, and they bring a wealth of experience to Ramstein’s law enforcement. (U.S. Airforce photo by Senior Airman Baker)

Zivilpolizei Marcus Mueller, left, 86th Security Forces Squadron Patrolman, drives a patrol vehicle with U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Regan, 86th SFS member, on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Feb. 26, 2018. Zivilpolizei, or Civilian Security Police, are the civilian side of the 86th SFS, and they bring a wealth of experience to Ramstein’s law enforcement. (U.S. Airforce photo by Senior Airman Baker)

Zivilpolizei Marcus Mueller, 86th Security Forces Squadron Patrolman, drives a patrol vehicle on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Feb. 26, 2018. ZPs act as liaisons between German authorities and the Air Force. They also help with matters of German law, overcome language barriers, and coordinate with German police, or Polizei. (U.S. Airforce photo by Senior Airman Baker)

Zivilpolizei Marcus Mueller, 86th Security Forces Squadron Patrolman, drives a patrol vehicle on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Feb. 26, 2018. ZPs act as liaisons between German authorities and the Air Force. They also help with matters of German law, overcome language barriers, and coordinate with German police, or Polizei. (U.S. Airforce photo by Senior Airman Baker)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Regan, left, 86th Security Forces Squadron member, and Zivilpolizei Marcus Mueller, 86th SFS patrolman, stand by the flight line on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Feb. 26, 2018. Zivilpolizei, or Civilian Security Police, remain at their station for years longer than Airmen do, and they often aquire a wealth of experience that adds to their unit’s security capabilities. (U.S. Airforce photo by Senior Airman Baker)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Regan, left, 86th Security Forces Squadron member, and Zivilpolizei Marcus Mueller, 86th SFS patrolman, stand by the flight line on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Feb. 26, 2018. Zivilpolizei, or Civilian Security Police, remain at their station for years longer than Airmen do, and they often aquire a wealth of experience that adds to their unit’s security capabilities. (U.S. Airforce photo by Senior Airman Baker)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany -- One can spot them at the large vehicle inspection gate or patrolling base, wearing Airman Battle Uniforms and blue berets. As members of the 86th Security Forces Squadron, they help keep Ramstein safe and work alongside Airman as German civilians. Zivilpolizei, or Civilian Security Police, bring a wealth of experience to Ramstein’s law-enforcement.

“We as Airmen come and go, but ZPs are here years and years,” said Airman 1st Class Daniel Regan, 86th SFS member. “They get to see short-term and long-term effects of changes and different policies.”

Regan is new to his career field, but he has a lot of experience to draw from.

“They mentor us as Airmen just getting here out of tech school, and they’re here to guide us,” Regan said. “The most valuable thing ZPs contribute to Ramstein is experience.”

The longest-standing ZP patrolman on Ramstein has been helping keep service members and their families safe for 28 years.

Another valuable ZP, Marcus Mueller, 86th SFS patrolman, has been a ZP on Ramstein for 15 years, and a patrolman for 10. During that time, he’s handled a lot of situations. Mueller has done everything from handing out tickets, to training new Airmen, to recovering lost children and saving lives through emergency medical care.

Mueller explained that ZPs act as liaisons between German authorities and the Air Force.

“If an active duty patrolman comes here to Ramstein, he knows about the Uniform Code of Military Justice, but he doesn’t know German law,” Mueller explained.

ZPs can help with matters of German law, overcome language barriers, and coordinate with German police, or Polizei.

Regan said that the most valuable thing he’s learned from working with ZPs is to keep an open mind to learning, because ZPs will try to share as much law enforcement experience as possible.

“For example, there could be a situation as simple as approaching someone who didn’t stop at a stop sign,” Regan said. “I might want to just walk up to them and give them a ticket or a briefing, but the ZPs will think a lot deeper, like ‘Do they have a weapon on them? Are there drugs? Why did they run the stop sign?’ Not to mention, if you do have to apprehend someone, the ZPs are experts on the extensive paperwork that follows.”

Mueller said that Airmen influence ZPs as well.

“They keep us awake,” Mueller said. “If you work on a base for 10, 20, or more years, that’s a long time. They come in and they’re fresh and they want to get out there. They keep us motivated. I love to train them because it’s always a new challenge, and challenges push you forward.”

ZPs have helped Regan understand more than just the job.

“I grew up on Rhode Island,” Regan said. “Coming from a very small place to the continent of Europe, working with the ZPs helped me acclimate to the culture of Germany and Europe in general. I hadn’t eaten döner until I met them.”

86th SFS Airmen and ZPs have each other’s backs, and they have good reasons to, Regan added.

“It’s teamwork,” he said. “Police in general, we’re a brotherhood. German, American, civilian, military—at the end of the day we’re coming together to accomplish a common goal, and that’s to keep everybody safe.”