Behind the scenes with the 86th MOS

Tech. Sgt. Laurence Littleton, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, pulls an aerospace and ground equipment power cord toward a parked C-130 to give the plain external power while it's parked on the Ramstein flight line July 19, 2007 at Ramstein Air Base Germany. AGE equipment is used to give parked aircraft external power so the aircraft doesn't have to continue to run after its parked, which in turn saves the Air Force fuel and money and helps ensure mission success. (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt. Laurence Littleton, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, pulls an aerospace and ground equipment power cord toward a parked C-130 to give the plain external power while it's parked on the Ramstein flight line July 19, 2007 at Ramstein Air Base Germany. AGE equipment is used to give parked aircraft external power so the aircraft doesn't have to continue to run after its parked, which in turn saves the Air Force fuel and money and helps ensure mission success. (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt. Jerry Peterson, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron,  performs a weight and balance check on a 40-year-old C-130 headed for the Aircraft Maintenance And Regeneration Center, more commonly known as the bone yard. Before each aircraft is sent to the AMARC it must go through a weight and balance check to ensure the aircraft is stripped of unnecessary items. The weight and balance check is also performed on other aircraft every two months. These checks are critical to mission success. The quality assurance inspectors who perform this additional duty, like Sergeant Peterson, are hand chosen by chiefs and squadron commanders.  (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt. Jerry Peterson, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, performs a weight and balance check on a 40-year-old C-130 headed for the Aircraft Maintenance And Regeneration Center, more commonly known as the bone yard. Before each aircraft is sent to the AMARC it must go through a weight and balance check to ensure the aircraft is stripped of unnecessary items. The weight and balance check is also performed on other aircraft every two months. These checks are critical to mission success. The quality assurance inspectors who perform this additional duty, like Sergeant Peterson, are hand chosen by chiefs and squadron commanders. (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt .Scotty Robinson, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, monitors aircraft being launched to ensure the process runs quickly and smoothly July 19, 2007 at Ramstein Air Base Gemany  (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt .Scotty Robinson, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, monitors aircraft being launched to ensure the process runs quickly and smoothly July 19, 2007 at Ramstein Air Base Gemany (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt. Chris Deal, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, looks through jacket files containing the history of different aircraft July 19 at Ramstein Air Base Germany. The jacket files must be reviewed before aircraft can be retired and sent to the aircraft maintenance and regeneration Center  most commonly known as the bone yard. Jacket files are also consulted quarterly to insure all aircraft have there correct and updated credentials. (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

Tech. Sgt. Chris Deal, 86th Maintenance Operations Squadron, looks through jacket files containing the history of different aircraft July 19 at Ramstein Air Base Germany. The jacket files must be reviewed before aircraft can be retired and sent to the aircraft maintenance and regeneration Center most commonly known as the bone yard. Jacket files are also consulted quarterly to insure all aircraft have there correct and updated credentials. (U.S. Air Force Photo/A1C Kenny Holston)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany -- The 86th Maintenance Operation Squadron is about more than wrench-turning. It's much more technical than you think. 

Maintenance operation control, maintenance training, analysis, plans and scheduling and engine management make up the core focus of the 86th MOS mission. With limited manning, due to deployments and force shaping, the 86th MOS still manages to reach its goals, getting the job done with speed and accuracy. 

"Our squadron is different from other maintenance squadrons in that we are directly responsible to the Maintenance Group Commander for the administration, analysis, training management, and programs and resources neccessary to support the group production effort," said Master Sgt. Rufus Love. 

The primary mission of the 86th MOS is to ensure the 86th Airlift Wing mission is always sucessful. This is done by analyzing long-range fleet health, developing wing flying maintenance schedules for more than 17 C-130 and one C-40 aircraft and controlling component configurations for 80 engines and 68 propellers while managing 700 personnel authorizations, 59 facilities, a $37 million dollar budget, and providing all maintenance training for U.S. Air Forces in Europe's largest air base. 

The 86th MOS has highly trained personnel that specialize in each of their six sections in the squadron.
 
"Our mission is vigorous but very necessary," said Airman 1st Class Jeff Hicken, who was the 86th AW Airman of the Quarter for the second quarter. "I enjoy what I do and am glad to be such a vital piece of the mission's puzzle." 

Overall the 86th MOS is responsible for ensuring that all the behind the scenes work of the airlift mission is done with no flaws. So, the next time you think of the MOS, think of them as more than just wrench-turners.